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Today, advanced electronics products are shrinking PCB, component, and packaging sizes and in some instances as small as a postage stamp or even smaller. Therefore, caution has to be taken when products like these are subjected to high temperature reflow cycles. It’s important to consider low-temperature profiling. It is more effective if you can reflow […]

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It has been a difficult year for families throughout the world and closer to home, for our friends, families and customers. On the bright side, we’re thankful that promising Covid-19 vaccines are on the horizon. If all goes well in 2021, we’ll be back to normal as much as possible. But in the meantime, despite […]

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With COVID-19 continuing to rage across the United States and the world, hospitals and medical centers are relying on their medical electronics equipment, including ventilators, to help improve COVID-19 patients’ health. EMS providers, contract manufacturers (CMs), and printed circuit board (PCB) fabricators are the strongest link in the supply chain critical for building medical electronics […]

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C4 and C2 bumps for flipchip assemblies are among the top techniques that require close attention during PCB microelectronics assembly. Those two are flipchip (FC) bump connection techniques and are crucial for efficient and cost-effective microelectronics assembly. In short, C4 and C2 are interposers that connect a small die in a FCBGA, using flipchip on […]

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OEMs and in particular medical equipment OEMs should become familiar with a packaging term now being introduced into PCB microelectronics assembly. This packaging involves a combination of flip-chip and BGA (FCBGA) packaging, Fig. 1. Figure 1: A BGA and a flip-chip interposer. (Source: Thorsten Meyer, Wikipedia, with minor modifications in red) FCBGA is critical due […]

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Real estate continues to be a precious commodity for substrates, package sizes, dies, and PCBs. One thing stays constant, any way you look at it, and that constant is we continue to shrink the real estate as much as possible. Not long ago, package on package (PoP) was a top technology on the SMT manufacturing […]

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The technology trends in the medical OEM field are moving toward smaller and advanced technologies, as shown in Fig. 1. Some of those advanced technologies are revolutionary new. For example, bio sensors for human and machine interface or HMI and new, flexible electrodes are leading the way. They are among the most recent developments and […]

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As I’ve said in earlier columns, the demand for smaller circuitry and packaging, as well as ever-shrinking PCB real estate, have continually pushed PCB assembly and manufacturing protocols. Newer, smaller, portable, and ingestible medical devices are opening new frontiers and are leading OEMs from other industries down that same road. Continue Reading at IConnect007

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A light-sensitive hydrogel for ingestible medical devices has recently been developed by MIT researchers, Fig. 1. Integrated with medical devices, doctors can insert those tiny systems into the human body to treat, diagnose or monitor disorders. Once those devices are no longer needed, they can then be dissolved inside the body by exposing them to […]

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Medical electronics continue to make even greater technological advances with recent R&D developments and promise to take on new forms. Biosensors for human-machine interfaces (HMIs) and new, flexible electrodes are leading the way. They are among the most recent developments and promise more sophisticated medical wearable devices for health monitoring. Continue Reading at IConnect007

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