Category Archives: Technical Publications

Pump up high reliability for IoT PCBs

The demand for and technology of IoT devices are rapidly passing the consumer market and landing squarely in medical electronics, IT/enterprise, industrial and military markets. And those IoT markets are experiencing dramatic growth. However, those markets are highly demanding when it comes to high reliability. IoT devices in these instances must be reliable to the […]

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Anatomy of ATE PCB Assembly

An automatic test equipment (ATE) PCB (a.k.a. a test board) is at the heart of all major test activities targeted at verifying a specific semiconductor chip’s functionality. Semiconductor chip technology has become so advanced that testing these highly complex devices must be performed effectively to ensure high reliability and functionality. This allows chipmakers to convey […]

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Ultra-clean IoT PCBs assure high reliability

IoT devices going into military/aerospace, medical and/or highly specialized industrial applications demand ultra-high reliability so they operate properly according to their tight specifications. That means the small IoT printed circuit boards (PCBs) must be ultra-clean and virtually free of any contaminants or chemical residues. But to understand how best to gain that IoT reliability, we […]

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IoT PCB considerations for startups

Since IoT devices are so new, you would think that getting an IoT printed circuit board (PCB) project off the ground starts by reinventing the wheel and going through a lot of technical hassle. That is definitely not true. But it doesn’t mean IoT startups have a clear path to stardom. Facing them is a […]

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Three types of IoT PCBs: Class I, Class II and Class III

Just like the big boys (meaning conventional printed circuit boards), IoT PCBs fall under the categories of Class I, II and III. Earlier, I noted that Class I IoT PCBs are pretty routine; those end applications cover virtually every consumer wearable you can think of. Class I IoT PCBs don’t demand a great measure of […]

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Far East IoT PCB fabrication: Don’t get your hopes too high

Buyer-beware caution comes at a time when growing numbers of entrepreneurs are trying to grab a share of the burgeoning IoT market. As we all know, IoT technology is branching out into a multitude of markets and then even branching out further within certain markets — like medical electronics, manufacturing, military/aerospace and others — well […]

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Flex Circuit Design Primer for Wearable/IoT Device

It’s a brand new ballgame with flex circuitry and wearable/IoT devices, so you have to add to your existing knowhow re conventional PCB design. Today, technology trends are increasingly toward flex circuits or a combination of rigid-flex circuits for wearable/IoT PCB designs. You can say those trends put us on a different footing, so to […]

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Assembling Wearable Electronics

With the exception of a few critical steps, assembling circuit boards for wearable electronics is no different than assembling conventional circuitry. Wearable electronics initially trickled into the market with Dick Tracy-inspired watches and healthcare bracelets. They quickly gained momentum, however, and it wasn’t long before the wearables market exploded. Today’s wearables—and new products still on […]

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EEWeb: NexLogic Eyes the Wearable Market with Tiny PCB Packages

While many leading technology companies have no problem finding success by supporting well-established industries, it’s fair to say that it takes a special brand of ambition to choose to approach new and open-ended avenues of innovation instead. Certainly, every industry is subject to its own forces of change and the necessity for creative evolution, it’s […]

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EETimes: Wearable PCB Designs Require Attention to Fundamentals

In the absence of printed circuit board standards in wearable IoT electronics, hardware developers need to pay close attention to fundamentals. Because of their small size and dimensions, few printed circuit board standards exist for the growing wearable Internet of Things market. Until they emerge, we’ll have to depend on what we have learned about […]

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